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Thread: Pit Book/Discussion Thread

  1. #101
    Broderick Hicks ellisat2's Avatar
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    thought this was most appropriate here:

    so i decided i want to re-read Gatsby. I went to the library to get a copy, and the only one they had was filed under "Young Adult Fiction". So I creeped around in the YA section trying to find it, while all the 12- and 13-year olds, and their parents especially, looked at me sideways.

  2. #102
    Quote Originally Posted by ellisat2 View Post
    thought this was most appropriate here:

    so i decided i want to re-read Gatsby. I went to the library to get a copy, and the only one they had was filed under "Young Adult Fiction". So I creeped around in the YA section trying to find it, while all the 12- and 13-year olds, and their parents especially, looked at me sideways.
    Ooof. Rough.

  3. #103
    Back to the top for Christmas!

    I've been swamped, and just now finished ' The Woman in White'.

    Slow at points, but entertaining and creepy. I think this would be a great gift for someone that likes to read a chapter or two before bed.

  4. #104
    Just finished Lord Jim by wakephan's BOI Joey Conrad. It was pretty good, exponentially better than HoD (i.e. it actually had characters and a plot), but the ending was disappointing. Not credible and not satisfying.

  5. #105
    I am currently reading High Crimes: The Fate of Everest in an Age of Greed by Michael Kodas. I'm only about 25% in, but am finding it really interesting so far. I loved Into Thin Air, and although I have no interest in mountaineering, always find Everest books and documentaries fascinating. This book focuses on the dark side of Everest (e.g. people lying about summiting, stealing people's oxygen tanks, leaving partners on the mountain, etc). Pretty effed up stuff so far.

  6. #106
    I'm also listening to The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Apparently if you've ever been in med school or even in some bio courses, etc, you have heard about or studied "HeLa" cells. This book is about the woman the original cells came from and the repercussions for her family (who didn't know for years that these cells were the basis for TONS of medical research). Interesting to think about the ethics of the situation, but also just about how much has been learned from everything.

  7. #107
    Hurricane Goddess wakegrrl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LadyDeac03 View Post
    I'm also listening to The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Apparently if you've ever been in med school or even in some bio courses, etc, you have heard about or studied "HeLa" cells. This book is about the woman the original cells came from and the repercussions for her family (who didn't know for years that these cells were the basis for TONS of medical research). Interesting to think about the ethics of the situation, but also just about how much has been learned from everything.
    I read this over the summer and it was fascinating.

  8. #108
    The Pumpfaker seventwofour's Avatar
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    I'm reading The Phantom Tollbooth right now. My sister got it for Christmas.

  9. #109
    Phantom Tollbooth is my jam!

  10. #110
    Quote Originally Posted by LadyDeac03 View Post
    I am currently reading High Crimes: The Fate of Everest in an Age of Greed by Michael Kodas. I'm only about 25% in, but am finding it really interesting so far. I loved Into Thin Air, and although I have no interest in mountaineering, always find Everest books and documentaries fascinating. This book focuses on the dark side of Everest (e.g. people lying about summiting, stealing people's oxygen tanks, leaving partners on the mountain, etc). Pretty effed up stuff so far.
    I just read the sample on Amazon and I think I'm going to have to pick that one up.

  11. #111
    Junior2016!!!!88!!1!!!!
    RubbinsRacin's Avatar
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    The room. Better than hunger games

  12. #112
    I just finished my second Jesse Ball novel, The Curfew. He is simply the best avant-garde writer today. His books are short, and not altogether difficult, but at the same time, they are some of the most challenging I've ever come across.

    Here are the two I've read, both of which I'd highly recommend:




  13. #113
    Quote Originally Posted by MHBDemon View Post
    Anyone else read The Art of Fielding?

    I highly recommend it. I've got about 50 pages left. Was reading it on bus to work and missed my stop by about 7 blocks.
    Just finished this actually. Received it as a gift for Christmas and fired through it in a few days, despite its length. Pretty damn good read, if at times overly melodramatic.

    Very well written and excellent story-telling. I found my moods really following those of the characters, especially Henry.

  14. #114
    OH yeah, I got that for xmas too. I need to start it. It's 4th on my list right now after all the other xmas boox.

  15. #115
    The Pumpfaker seventwofour's Avatar
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    Art of Fielding made like every major publication's list for top books of the year.

    I just wrapped up Homage to Catalonia by Orwell. Salinger's Nine Stories before that. I'm doing a little non-fiction now (New Black Man by Mark Anthony Neal) before taking on Franzen's Freedom.

  16. #116
    I read The Alchemist the last few days. It was a short read but I really enjoyed it, especially since so many parts were relevant to my life right now. It's funny how books do that sometimes. Anyone have a good, similar suggestion for me to start on?

  17. #117
    Bernie Eskimo Bro
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    Quote Originally Posted by deac04 View Post
    I read The Alchemist the last few days. It was a short read but I really enjoyed it, especially since so many parts were relevant to my life right now. It's funny how books do that sometimes. Anyone have a good, similar suggestion for me to start on?
    eta: nm

    I haven't read one of his novels yet, but Salman Rushdie writes stories in similar settings.
    Last edited by KickballDeac; 05-26-2012 at 09:15 AM.

  18. #118
    Midnight's Children is a good start for Rushdie; I wouldn't hop right into the Satanic Verses.

    However, he is very long-winded.

  19. #119
    Quote Originally Posted by deac04 View Post
    I read The Alchemist the last few days. It was a short read but I really enjoyed it, especially since so many parts were relevant to my life right now. It's funny how books do that sometimes. Anyone have a good, similar suggestion for me to start on?
    If you're down for more Paulo Coelho, I really like the Devil and Miss Prym.

  20. #120
    The Pumpfaker seventwofour's Avatar
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    I scooped up the LaValle and Bell on account of Townie's recs at the library the other day, as well as Nabokov The Gift. Started Big Machine.

    I remember a discussion here about the different translations for the Brothers Karamazov (as part of a larger discussion about Russian translations in general) and somebody advocated a certain translation pretty strongly. Anybody remember which translator?

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