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Thread: Awesome Map Thread

  1. #381
    Robert O'Kelley
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    And they say American manufacturing is dead.

  2. #382
    Robert O'Kelley
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    John Snow’s cholera map
    I heard he knows nothing, John Snow.

  3. #383
    How is NC not tobacco or hogs?

  4. #384
    because it's airplanes

  5. #385
    Bernie Eskimo Bro
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    First in flight, bitches.

  6. #386
    Quote Originally Posted by KickballDeac View Post
    First in flight, bitches.
    Suck it, New Hampshire!

  7. #387
    Oil rich Alaska's export is.... zinc?? Someone tell me about zinc.

  8. #388
    Quote Originally Posted by ipitytheblue View Post
    How is NC not tobacco or hogs?
    There's no tobacco left in NC. All of the tobacco fields are full of soy and corn.

  9. #389
    Quote Originally Posted by bym051d View Post
    Suck it, New Hampshire!
    Suck it, Ohio. That would be the only state who would care.

  10. #390
    Quote Originally Posted by awaken View Post
    Oil rich Alaska's export is.... zinc?? Someone tell me about zinc.
    Zinc, in commerce also spelter, is a chemical element with symbol Zn and atomic number 30. It is the first element of group 12 of the periodic table. In some respects zinc is chemically similar to magnesium: its ion is of similar size and its only common oxidation state is +2. Zinc is the 24th most abundant element in Earth's crust and has five stable isotopes. The most common zinc ore is sphalerite (zinc blende), a zinc sulfide mineral. The largest mineable amounts are found in Australia, Asia, and the United States. Zinc production includes froth flotation of the ore, roasting, and final extraction using electricity (electrowinning).

    Brass, which is an alloy of copper and zinc, has been used since at least the 10th century BC in Judea[2] and by the 7th century BC in Ancient Greece.[3] Zinc metal was not produced on a large scale until the 12th century in India and was unknown to Europe until the end of the 16th century. The mines of Rajasthan have given definite evidence of zinc production going back to the 6th century BC.[4] To date, the oldest evidence of pure zinc comes from Zawar, in Rajasthan, as early as the 9th century AD when a distillation process was employed to make pure zinc.[5] Alchemists burned zinc in air to form what they called "philosopher's wool" or "white snow".

    The element was probably named by the alchemist Paracelsus after the German word Zinke. German chemist Andreas Sigismund Marggraf is credited with discovering pure metallic zinc in 1746. Work by Luigi Galvani and Alessandro Volta uncovered the electrochemical properties of zinc by 1800. Corrosion-resistant zinc plating of iron (hot-dip galvanizing) is the major application for zinc. Other applications are in batteries, small non-structural castings, and alloys, such as brass. A variety of zinc compounds are commonly used, such as zinc carbonate and zinc gluconate (as dietary supplements), zinc chloride (in deodorants), zinc pyrithione (anti-dandruff shampoos), zinc sulfide (in luminescent paints), and zinc methyl or zinc diethyl in the organic laboratory.

    Zinc is an essential mineral perceived by the public today as being of "exceptional biologic and public health importance", especially increasingly regarding prenatal and postnatal development.[6] Zinc deficiency affects about two billion people in the developing world and is associated with many diseases.[7] In children it causes growth retardation, delayed sexual maturation, infection susceptibility, and diarrhea.[6] Enzymes with a zinc atom in the reactive center are widespread in biochemistry, such as alcohol dehydrogenase in humans.[8] Consumption of excess zinc can cause ataxia, lethargy and copper deficiency.
    I know how to spell definitely.

  11. #391
    Galvanization, which is the coating of iron or steel to protect the metals against corrosion, is the most familiar form of using zinc in this way. In 2009 in the United States, 55% or 893 thousand tonnes of the zinc metal was used for galvanization.
    I know how to spell definitely.

  12. #392
    I know how to spell definitely.

  13. #393
    The Pumpfaker Baconwfu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by awaken View Post
    Oil rich Alaska's export is.... zinc?? Someone tell me about zinc.
    It's currently illegal to export crude oil....thus oil will not be Alaska's greatest export.

  14. #394

  15. #395
    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDeac View Post
    The only problem with that map is that it's not bigger.

  16. #396

  17. #397

  18. #398

  19. #399
    Robert O'Kelley
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    Kissin cousins:


  20. #400
    Astonishing that Sudan, Pakistan and Mauritania lead the way.

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