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Thread: Fuck yeah, Science!

  1. #1

    Fuck yeah, Science!

    Use this thread to post cool things SCIENCE does.

  2. #2
    I disagree with you
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  3. #3
    She blinded me with it!

  4. #4
    OGBoards Chaplain
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    Gives religion a sparring partner.

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    Resident Astrophysicist
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    Close examination of the bones revealed that Sue was 28 years old when she died, making her the oldest T. rex known. Her PBS Nova episode reported she died in a seasonal stream bed, which washed away some small bones. During her life, this carnivore received several injuries and suffered from numerous pathologies. An injury to the right shoulder region of Sue resulted in a damaged shoulder blade, a torn tendon in the right arm, and three broken ribs. This damage subsequently healed (though one rib healed into two separate pieces), indicating Sue survived the incident. The left fibula is twice the diameter of the right one, likely a result of infection. Original reports of this bone being broken were contradicted by the CT scans which showed no fracture. Multiple holes in the front of the skull were originally thought to be bite marks by some, but subsequent study found these to be areas of infection instead, possibly from an infestation of an ancestral form of Trichomonas gallinae, a protozoan parasite that infests birds. Damage to the back end of the skull was interpreted early on as a fatal bite wound. Subsequent study by Field Museum paleontologists found no bite marks. The distortion and breakage seen in some of the bones in the back of the skull was likely caused by post-mortem trampling. Some of the tail vertebrae are fused in a pattern typical of arthritis due to injury. The animal is also believed to have suffered from gout. In addition, there is extra bone in some of the tail vertebrae likely caused by the stresses brought on by Sue's great size. Sue did not die as a result of any of these injuries; her cause of death is not known.

  6. #6
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    Laetoli is a site in Tanzania, dated to the Plio-Pleistocene and famous for its hominin footprints, preserved in volcanic ash (Site G). The site of the Laetoli footprints is located 45 km south of Olduvai gorge. The location was excavated by archaeologist Mary Leakey in 1978. “The Laetoli Footprints” received significant recognition by the public, providing convincing evidence of bipedalism in Pliocene hominids based on analysis of the impressions.


    Dated to 3.7 million years ago they were also the oldest known evidence of bipedalism at the time they were found, although now older evidence has been found such as the Ardipithecus ramidus fossils. The footprints and skeletal structure excavated at Laetoli showed clear evidence that bipedalism preceded enlarged brains in hominids. Although it is highly debated, it is believed the three individuals who made these footprints belonged to the species Australopithecus afarensis. Along with footprints were other discoveries including hominin and animal skeletal remains and Acheulean artifacts.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laetoli

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TWDeac View Post


    Close examination of the bones revealed that Sue was 28 years old when she died, making her the oldest T. rex known. Her PBS Nova episode reported she died in a seasonal stream bed, which washed away some small bones. During her life, this carnivore received several injuries and suffered from numerous pathologies. An injury to the right shoulder region of Sue resulted in a damaged shoulder blade, a torn tendon in the right arm, and three broken ribs. This damage subsequently healed (though one rib healed into two separate pieces), indicating Sue survived the incident. The left fibula is twice the diameter of the right one, likely a result of infection. Original reports of this bone being broken were contradicted by the CT scans which showed no fracture. Multiple holes in the front of the skull were originally thought to be bite marks by some, but subsequent study found these to be areas of infection instead, possibly from an infestation of an ancestral form of Trichomonas gallinae, a protozoan parasite that infests birds. Damage to the back end of the skull was interpreted early on as a fatal bite wound. Subsequent study by Field Museum paleontologists found no bite marks. The distortion and breakage seen in some of the bones in the back of the skull was likely caused by post-mortem trampling. Some of the tail vertebrae are fused in a pattern typical of arthritis due to injury. The animal is also believed to have suffered from gout. In addition, there is extra bone in some of the tail vertebrae likely caused by the stresses brought on by Sue's great size. Sue did not die as a result of any of these injuries; her cause of death is not known.

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    Resident Astrophysicist
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    The Sue thing is wild to me. She shows signs of having had a brain eating parasite similar to those that infest current day birds. Just think about that!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TWDeac View Post
    The Sue thing is wild to me. She shows signs of having had a brain eating parasite similar to those that infest current day birds. Just think about that!
    Even the word raptor means...bird of prey

  10. #10

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by TWDeac View Post
    Sue did not die as a result of any of these injuries; her cause of death is not known.
    lol strong work science!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by TWDeac View Post
    The Sue thing is wild to me. She shows signs of having had a brain eating parasite similar to those that infest current day birds. Just think about that!
    Thanks for sharing. Really fascinating. I hope they find out how she died. Crazy that we can pinpoint these things nowadays.

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    Quote Originally Posted by waketheuniverse View Post
    if you're interested in geodesy, this book is surprisingly interesting, albeit a little long:


  14. #14
    Scott "Rufio" Feather Junebug's Avatar
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    Gives us unparalleled hubris

  15. #15
    Scott "Rufio" Feather Junebug's Avatar
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    You're 100% totally wrong but fair enough.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Junebug View Post
    Gives us unparalleled hubris
    http://www.ogboards.com/forums/showt...k-you-Science!

  17. #17
    #morescientistshubris

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junebug View Post
    Gives us unparalleled hubris

  19. #19
    I disagree with you
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    why did God forsake his only dinosaur

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ImTheCaptain View Post
    why did God forsake his only dinosaur
    Can't have two kings.

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