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Thread: End of the road for truckers?

  1. #41
    I'm cool with anything that helps to sink CSX. Those fuckers' ability to legally ignore virtually all public and private property rights is absurd.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by 2&2 Slider To Leyritz View Post
    I'm cool with anything that helps to sink CSX. Those fuckers' ability to legally ignore virtually all public and private property rights is absurd.
    Have had multiple dealings with CSX as an attorney, both transactional and litigation. They are huge assholes. Would love to see them fall someday.

  3. #43

  4. #44
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    truckies? woof, no wonder the Aussies are having a problem

  5. #45
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    End of the road for truckers?

    “The conditions of the road out there, you’ve got to have your wits about you,” he says. “An automated truck would probably have a hissy fit, where a human would realise, ‘OK, I might have to detour off-road into the gully to get around it.’

    “Truckies can use their sense of smell, too. If the engine starts to get hot, you can smell the coolant and go, ‘Hang on, something’s going on here,’ [and] pull over before something catastrophic happens.”

    I feel bad for this guy.

    So how to autonomous trucks handle fueling? Would they drive point to point between human manned fueling stations or would it be like it Cars where they just drive on a pedal and it happens automatically?

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by ImTheCaptain View Post
    truckies? woof, no wonder the Aussies are having a problem
    I lived with an Austrailian for a few months. They love the -ie suffix.

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDeac View Post
    “The conditions of the road out there, you’ve got to have your wits about you,” he says. “An automated truck would probably have a hissy fit, where a human would realise, ‘OK, I might have to detour off-road into the gully to get around it.’

    “Truckies can use their sense of smell, too. If the engine starts to get hot, you can smell the coolant and go, ‘Hang on, something’s going on here,’ [and] pull over before something catastrophic happens.”

    I feel bad for this guy.

    So how to autonomous trucks handle fueling? Would they drive point to point between human manned fueling stations or would it be like it Cars where they just drive on a pedal and it happens automatically?

    Yeah, really. He is pretty clueless about the capabilities of a computer engine monitoring system. Several dozen or hundreds of sensors could be built into the engine and other components to monitor engine temperature, tire pressures (no more tire pieces from dual wheel tires run flat until they come apart.)

    Refueling could be handled either way you describe. Totally automated. Or with a return to the pump jockey of the last century and New Jersey.

    Another saving that could come about from self driving trucks is elimination of the cab and windshield area where the driver sees out. Compact all that stuff so it fits below the front of the trailer and get a bigger trailer that is on top of the tractor. Cab could have pylons with an array of road sensors at its front, but not much more in front of the cargo trailer.
    Than attach to sensor system array on the trailer(s). Two 48 foot trailers in tandem in a 100 foot total package.

    Could easily have steerable wheels in the middle of the longer tandems to make them more maneuverable. That's a job that no human would or could do, but a computer would be great at.

  8. #48
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    https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/18/buil...struction.html

    Ready-Campbell, whose dad was a general contractor, is getting in on the action and taking advantage of the dramatic advances in automation to go after construction. For the past two years, he's been developing software and sensors that can turn off-the-shelf excavators into robots that can dig holes with precision for hours without a break.
    From a small dirt field in a sparsely populated part of San Francisco, Ready-Campbell's 10-person start-up, Built Robotics, has been stealthily operating a retrofitted skid steer, directing it via a computer program to move around dirt.
    Be sure to watch the video.

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Deacon923 View Post
    Maybe what he means is that the truck itself is electronically programmed to "stay in its lane" i.e. it gets on the highway and drives the same route over and over again, so all it has to do is brake and turn off at the correct exit. that technology already exists and is actually fairly old news (Tesla autopilot).

    From what I have read, if the autopilots find themselves in a situation they can't handle, like blinding weather, they pull over and stop until conditions improve or a human takes over. Some articles indicate that there will be a period when drivers are in the cab but not driving, i.e. they are only there to take over if there is a problem. Depending on how regulations change (i.e., is the driver allowed to sleep while the autopilot is moving?) even that could significantly decrease trucker employment.
    While a lot of this is true many companies will still have to have drivers physically in the truck to do the manual part of the delivery once the truck arrives at it's intended location. As someone who works in the trucking industry, it's amazing how far behind the rest of the world it is technologically. Many companies are just now getting outfitted with ELD's due to the impending regulations. Any type of change has been fought tooth and nail for years. Lot's of companies just don't want to change and they will get left behind.

  10. #50
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    Why would someone need to ride in the truck to do the manual part? Couldn't those people just be at the point of delivery?

  11. #51
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  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhDeac View Post
    Why would someone need to ride in the truck to do the manual part? Couldn't those people just be at the point of delivery?
    depends on the type of product/delivery; not large 18 wheelers moving stuff between warehouses but most trucking is Final Mile stuff, dropping off pallets of stuff at retail level

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