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Thread: Trump Committed Tax Fraud & Insurance Fraud & Bank Fraud

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by RJKarl View Post
    The most outrageous part of the article is how try tried to steal his father's estate from his siblings. That's a special kind of scum.
    Speaking of scum:

    https://www.ogboards.com/forums/show...-Chuck-Schumer

  2. #62
    Fred Trump sure looks like one racist motherfucker

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by marquee moon View Post
    Please file. The discovery would be most telling.

  4. #64
    Quote Originally Posted by WFFaithful View Post
    Please file. The discovery would be most telling.
    srsly that would be monumentally stupid.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by BarcaDeac View Post
    Fred Trump sure looks like one racist motherfucker
    He was arrested at a KKK rally/riot in Queens.

    The apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

  6. #66
    THE quintessential dwarf dartsndeacs's Avatar
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    Sounds like Trump needs the GOP to keep the House otherwise the Dems get access to his tax returns.
    just drivin' round in John Voight's car

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by palmab03 View Post
    Sounds like Trump needs the GOP to keep the House otherwise the Dems get access to his tax returns.
    And they will publish every one of them as they should have.

  8. #68
    It’s pretty clear to me from that article that Fred Trump committed some serious violations and crimes.

    It’s less clear what Trump May actually be civilly or criminally liable for.

    It’s clear that the lawyers are already setting up their reasonable cause defenses to any accuracy penalties though.
    Hungry

  9. #69
    I think it is more damaging to Trump politically vs. any kind of actual criminal/civil liability, given the age of the charges. It enables Democrats to undermine the core of his persona as a self-made billionaire. Will the hard core rubes care- no, of course not, but if it makes a few marginal Trump supporters less enthusiastic/less likely to come out and vote for him then that's important in a closely divided electorate.

  10. #70

  11. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by PhDeac View Post
    Yet they can’t name any Democrat tax cheats who have gone unpunished by Democrats.
    Ellison!

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by wakephan09 View Post
    Ellison!
    His cheating wasn't on taxes.

  13. #73

  14. #74
    Trump and the Aristocracy of Fraud: Government of tax cheats, by tax cheats, for tax cheats.


    It turns out that I may have done Donald Trump an injustice.

    You see, I’ve always been skeptical of his claims to be a great dealmaker. But what we’ve just learned is that his negotiating prowess began early. Indeed, it was so amazing that he was already making $200,000 a year in today’s dollars at a very young age.

    Specifically, that’s what he was making when he was 3 years old. He was a millionaire by the age of 8. Of course, the money came from his father — who spent decades evading the taxes he was legally required to pay on money given to his children.

    The blockbuster New York Times report on the Trump family’s history of fraud is really about two distinct although linked kinds of fraudulence.

    On one side, the family engaged in tax fraud on a huge scale, using a variety of money-laundering techniques to avoid paying what it owed. On the other, the story Donald Trump tells about his life — his depiction of himself as a self-made businessman who made billions starting from humble roots — has always been a lie: Not only did he inherit his wealth, receiving the equivalent of more than $400 million from his father, but Fred Trump bailed his son out after deals went bad.

    One implication of these revelations is that Trump supporters who imagine that they’ve found a straight-talking champion who will drain the swamp while using his business acumen to make America great again have been suckered, bigly.

    But the tale of the Trump money is part of a bigger story. Even among those unhappy at the extent to which we live in an era of soaring inequality and growing concentration of wealth at the top, there has been a tendency to believe that great wealth is, more often than not, earned more or less honestly. It’s only now that the amounts of sheer corruption and lawbreaking that underlie our march toward oligarchy have started to come into focus.

    Until recently, my guess is that most economists, even tax experts, would have agreed that tax avoidance by corporations and the wealthy — which is legal — was a big issue, but tax evasion — hiding money from the tax man — was a lesser one. It was obvious that some rich people were exploiting legal if morally dubious loopholes in the tax code, but the prevailing view was that simply defrauding the tax authorities and hence the public wasn’t that widespread in advanced countries.

    But this view always rested on shaky foundations. After all, tax evasion, almost by definition, doesn’t show up in official statistics, and the super-wealthy aren’t in the habit of mouthing off about what great tax cheats they are. To get a real picture of how much fraud is going on, you either have to do what The Times did — exhaustively investigate the finances of a particular family — or rely on lucky breaks that reveal what was previously hidden.

    Two years ago, a huge lucky break came in the form of the Panama Papers, a trove of data leaked from a Panamanian law firm that specialized in helping people hide their wealth in offshore havens, and a smaller leak from HSBC. While the unsavory details revealed by these leaks made headlines right away, their true significance has only become clear with work done by Berkeley’s Gabriel Zucman and associates in cooperation with Scandinavian tax authorities.

    Matching information from the Panama Papers and other leaks with national tax data, these researchers found that outright tax evasion actually is a big deal at the top. The truly wealthy end up paying a much lower effective tax rate than the merely rich, not because of loopholes in tax law, but because they break the law. The wealthiest taxpayers, the researchers found, pay on average 25 percent less than they owe — and, of course, many individuals pay even less.

    This is a big number. If America’s wealthy evade taxes on the same scale (which they almost surely do), they’re probably costing the government around as much as the food stamp program does. And they’re also using tax evasion to entrench their privilege and pass it on to their heirs, which is the real Trump story.

    The obvious question is, what are our elected representatives doing about this epidemic of cheating? Well, Republicans in Congress have been on the case for years: They’ve been systematically defunding the Internal Revenue Service, crippling its ability to investigate tax fraud. We don’t just have government by tax cheats; we have government of tax cheats, for tax cheats.

    What we’re learning, then, is that the story of what’s happening to our society is even worse than we thought. It’s not just that the president of the United States is, as veteran tax reporter David Cay Johnston put it, a “financial vampire,” cheating taxpayers the way he has cheated just about everyone else who deals with him.

    Beyond that, our trend toward oligarchy — rule by the few — is also looking more and more like kakistocracy — rule by the worst, or at least the most unscrupulous. The corruption isn’t subtle; on the contrary, it’s cruder than almost anyone imagined. It also runs deep, and it has infected our politics, quite literally up to its highest levels.
    I love mankind...it’s people I can’t stand!!

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by WakeForestRanger View Post
    Wyden got an official response.


  16. #76

  17. #77
    Showtime is airing a documentary on this story tonight.

    The Family Business,” a Showtime documentary short broadcast Sunday night, prompts this question more than perhaps any other. It focuses on the New York Times report, published on Oct. 2, into Donald Trump’s family finances and the degree of fraudulence that padded both his claims that his father had given him a fairly small loan, paid back with interest, and his dealings with the Internal Revenue Service. Cameras recorded the moving and strangely mundane scene before it went live, with reporters stuck in a midtown Manhattan conference room, as tense as actors waiting for opening night of a play.

    https://variety.com/2018/tv/columns/...me-1202971780/

  18. #78
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    I wonder if it explains why the NYT essentially buried it during the Kavanaugh mess.

  19. #79
    So uh, now that the SCOTUS vote is done, maybe people will starting talking about the president committing tax fraud, possibly in the hundreds of millions of dollars? For the NYT to flat out accuse him of fraud they clearly have the receipts. Wild that this isn't a bigger story.

  20. #80
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    Because the NYT essentially buried in under Kavanaugh. Was another outlet on the story too?

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