Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Pro league pays HS players $100k

  1. #1

  2. #2
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    How many teams? Will kids who play in that "league" for 2-3 years be considered as good as college players in the draft?

    What happens when players can get to the G-League easier and probably for more money?

    Until the NBA CBA is redone, it seems these guys would be silly to spend millions of dollars if they could become obsolete in 2-3 years.

  3. #3
    PM a mod to cement your internet status forever
    PhDeac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    119,683
    The main reason people care enough to watch videos of high school basketball players is because they may end up playing in college then the NBA. Nobody is going to care enough to watch them play in a random league.

  4. #4
    Read the article.

    About 30 players initially. So, guessing a very small number of teams. Two or three. This league is different than the G League as it targets elite players WHILE they are in HS, as young as 16. The G-League new rules pertain to players after HS. The league may fail, but it will further reduce the pool of elite players in college. Football is safe because it too hard to pay enough players to play football, but college hoops will be more like college baseball in a few years.
    Last edited by Pilchard; 03-04-2021 at 02:58 PM.

  5. #5
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    I did read the article. They can't succeed with thirty players.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by RJKarl View Post
    I did read the article. They can't succeed with thirty players.
    OK, didn't seem like it from your post. The authority has spoken. Nothing to see here.

  7. #7
    Based on my quick google search, G League players make up to $35k a year

  8. #8
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    Quote Originally Posted by DeacKillsaDevil View Post
    Based on my quick google search, G League players make up to $35k a year
    That is in the process of being changed.

    https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/...league-pathway

    "California high school star Jalen Green, the No. 1 prospect in the 2020 ESPN 100, is making the leap to a reshaped NBA professional pathway program -- a G League initiative that sources say will pay elite prospects $500,000-plus and provide a one-year development program outside of the minor league's traditional team structure."

    They are planning to expand the number of players getting big salaries in the G-League.

  9. #9
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Pilchard View Post
    OK, didn't seem like it from your post. The authority has spoken. Nothing to see here.
    I'm so sorry. I didn't bow and kiss the bottom of your shoes as you demand.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by RJKarl View Post
    That is in the process of being changed.

    https://www.espn.com/nba/story/_/id/...league-pathway

    "California high school star Jalen Green, the No. 1 prospect in the 2020 ESPN 100, is making the leap to a reshaped NBA professional pathway program -- a G League initiative that sources say will pay elite prospects $500,000-plus and provide a one-year development program outside of the minor league's traditional team structure."

    They are planning to expand the number of players getting big salaries in the G-League.
    Thanks!

  11. #11
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    Anytime.

    The question becomes if the G-League gets most of the Top 20 players, who will be left for Overtime?

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RJKarl View Post
    Anytime.

    The question becomes if the G-League gets most of the Top 20 players, who will be left for Overtime?
    Apparently, RJ is not comprehending the sweet spot for Overtime. To spell it out: G-league and Overtime are not necessarily after the same players. Overtime targets kids BEFORE they graduate from HS (16 to 18 year-olds). The G-League is now allowed to sign players AFTER HS (i.e., kids that are 18 and over). The Overtime niche would be trying to sign someone who is HS sophomore now and pay them for their last two years before they graduate from HS, after playing two years for OT, an 18 year-old could then play for the G-League. There is a big risk, because if the 16 year old doesn't pan out after two years in OT, he will have lost his college eligibility because he already has been paid to play hoops.
    Last edited by Pilchard; 03-04-2021 at 04:35 PM.

  13. #13
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    Of course, you have to be snarky and pseudo-superior rather than just discussing issues. It really helps the tone.

  14. #14
    Whatever, sorry for hurting your feelings.

    You claimed to have read the article, and then you posted something that was completely wrong about how the G-League and OT would be after the same players, when the entire point of OT is to pursue and pay players before they graduated HS (as opposed to the G-League which now offer to pay kids after HS), and as a result, the G-League and OT would NOT be after the same players.

  15. #15
    This OT league could very quickly get some of the coaches of top HS players really upset. Also the shoe company sponsored AAU teams and tournaments people won't be happy either.

  16. #16
    Only scanned the article, but with this being pretty much a one-shot at future pro success for these players, i.e. no college option, the dynamics of playing time, how a still-physically developing 16 y/o will be utilized, keeping moms & daddys happy, etc. will be interesting. Of course much of that already exists at the college level, but this has more of a college football binary feel to it, i.e. you make it to the NBA or G-League your first year of pro eligibility or you're done.
    I would assume these teams will have a short bench, with minutes being shared fairly equally.

  17. #17
    The article speaks about a "rotating roster" of players instead of teams. That could make the teams more like pickup teams. Your team mate today is your opponent tomorrow. IMHO, that would hurt development of team focus in the players and make it more about the "me."

    Will the kids be willing and able to learn to play team defense if their team mates change frequently? Games could look like high school all-star games.

  18. #18
    Banhammer'd
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    HB, CA
    Posts
    78,116
    The reason these kind of programs work in Europe for soccer and basketball is they are associated with pro teams. Having so many teams, they get to play top comp for a couple of years before reaching the age they can go pro.

    Given that they will be pros the instant they sign on, I would guess they can't play other HS or preps and probably can't play in AAU tourneys.

    An interesting question might be will these guys be eligible to play in FIBA and other international events. Yes, young pros can play for Spain or Italy. The question in the U.S. is whether younger players might lose some eligibility for playing with pros.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Deaconblue View Post
    The article speaks about a "rotating roster" of players instead of teams. That could make the teams more like pickup teams. Your team mate today is your opponent tomorrow. IMHO, that would hurt development of team focus in the players and make it more about the "me."

    Will the kids be willing and able to learn to play team defense if their team mates change frequently? Games could look like high school all-star games.
    All of this is about "the ME."
    Practice? You talking about practice? No way.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •